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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 163-165

Data availability and feasibility of various techniques to predict response to volume expansion in critically ill patients


1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
2 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Correspondence Address:
Michael J Lanspa
Intermountain Medical Center, Shock-Trauma Intensive Care Unit, 5121 S. Cottonwood Street, Murray, UT 84107
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-5151.214412

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Objective: The accuracy of various techniques to predict response to volume expansion in shock has been studied, but less well known is how feasible these techniques are in the ICU. Methods: This is a prospective observation single-center study of inpatients from a mixed profile ICU who received volume expansion. At time of volume expansion, we determined whether a particular technique to predict response was feasible, according to rules developed from available literature and nurse assessment. Results: We studied 214 volume expansions in 97 patients. The most feasible technique was central venous pressure (50%), followed by vena cava collapsibility, (47%) passive leg raise (42%), and stroke volume variation (22%). Aortic velocity variation, and pulse pressure variation, and were rarely feasible (1% each). In 37% of volume expansions, no technique that we assessed was feasible. Conclusions: Techniques to predict response to volume expansion are infeasible in many patients in shock.


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