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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 92-98

Traumatic injuries associated with suicide attempts: A retrospective study from single national level 1 trauma center


1 Department of Surgery, Trauma and Vascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
2 Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma and Vascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
3 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery, Hamad Injury Prevention Program, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
4 Department of Surgery, Trauma Surgery, National Trauma Registry, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
5 Laboratory Department, Clinical Services Unit, Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar
6 Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma and Vascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital; Department of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Ayman El-Menyar
Department of Surgery, Clinical Research, Trauma and Vascular Surgery, Hamad General Hospital, P.O. Box 3050, Doha
Qatar
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJCIIS.IJCIIS_64_19

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Background: Suicide is a complex phenomenon involving several risk factors. We aimed to describe the frequency, pattern, and outcomes of patients with traumatic injuries following suicide attempts admitted to a level 1 trauma center. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from Qatar National Trauma Registry and mortuary database. The study included all patients with traumatic injuries following suicide attempts, admitted to the Hamad Trauma Center (HTC) from April 2008 to March 2018. Results: During this 10–year period, 206 patients were admitted to the HTC for injuries associated with suicide attempts. The majority were males (76%), young age (mean age 31 years), and expatriates specifically from South Asia (55%). The most common injury was due to self-inflicted cutting and piercing (51%) followed by jumping from height (30%). Females chose jumping from high place more often as a method of suicide attempt (59% vs. 20%), while males chose self-stabbing or cutting their throat (59% vs. 25%) (P = 0.001). Most of the patients had head injuries (30%) that was severe in terms of abbreviated injury scale score (3.6 ± 0.9). More than half (54%) of the patients required psychiatric consultations. The in-hospital mortality was 8% which was comparable in both genders. Conclusions: The present study revealed that 1.8% of trauma admissions at HTC were related to suicidal attempts. Better understanding of risk factors is important in devising preventive strategies.


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